So Called Hepatitis C Science Panel on Bias

I read the transcript of a panel discussion regarding Hepatitis C and bias.  The facilitator was a Ph.D. who did not share her area of expertise. My bias is showing here.  Is she knowledgeable about Hepatitis C or bias,  or is she a facilitator for hire?  The panel was a registered nurse, a social worker and a patient, all with Hepatitis C.  Sounds promising.

But the summary of the discussion was this:

  • We need more money from the government to educate people with Hepatitis C about treatments.
  • We need more money from the government so we can support Hepatitis C patients in the same way HIV patients have been supported, with more teams (I am not clear as to what this statement means).
  • The patient’s affirmation was “Sticks and stones may break my bones but words will never hurt me” and “I learned a lot from a support group made of fellow Hepatitis C patients”.

I am with the patient, the tools are within as opposed to without. If solutions tie to outside money or the government, no progress is  made  and we are stuck. But if a new patient begins his journey with only a support group and he feels like shit (which he will), the danger of isolation is there and almost guaranteed.  I suggest adding a couple of strong friends or family members who can take turns helping you ride this bull, to keep you on for the eight seconds  (treatment duration). Forgive my analogy, I am from Texas where that makes sense. Two wonderful people for me were my husband and  the nurse. But, each patient experience is unique.  Keep trying until you find who and what helps you the most.

The pharmaceutical companies are reaching out to the masses.  They are talking about testing new treatments.  The companies are portraying patients as members of society, people who the general population can relate to. Not just the parrot heads and junkies as portrayed in the past.

parrothead BTW, I overheard my first hepatologist refer to Hep C patients in the waiting room as parrot heads (followers of Jimmy Buffett). That was my introduction to the label. I shared my thoughts with him about that descriptor for patients.

The pharmaceutical company  groundswell will reduce the stigma of having Hepatitis C.  Sure the motive is profit. So who cares?  Not a cured person like me (cured makes me sound like a ham). I worked in the pharmaceutical world for a quarter of a century. Research departments, when not linked to marketing, do great work. That is all I need to know. Let the insurance companies fight out the money issues. Give the insurance companies something to focus on other than patients. Oops, my damn bias is showing. I am curious to see how the “Affordable Care Act” (Obama Care) approaches  Hepatitis C.

As the panel patient points out, it is my efforts that will provide my shield from stereotypes. At least until the drug company marketing departments get the job done.

check out http://www.hepatitiscnews.com where I, and other people with Hepatitis C, share information.

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My Teeth? The Least Of My Hepatitis C Problems…

RottenTeeth

Face it, a lot of my peeps with Hepatitis C have bad teeth. If you have a drinking or drug problem, hygiene may be low on the  daily living list.  Yet before treatment for HEP C, the medical team encourages you to catch up all systems.  So, maintenance for eyes, lungs, naughty bits, you get the idea.  I didn’t have big concerns because I was current on all systems, having been clean and sober a quarter of a century.  Treatment HO!

Well, Hep C treatment affected my priorities.  I was so sick.  Daily I was just trying to stay on the planet,  hoping gravity didn’t take a holiday. I didn’t care at all about my grooming, cleanliness, appearance, or anything that healthy people care about.

And my teeth? I have been a nut about dental hygiene since discovering dental floss at age twenty-one. I come from a long line of false teeth people cleaning between teeth with match book covers. Yuck. I never saw a dentist until I was fifteen. Dr. Ache, yes that was his name, removed an important molar (aren’t they all?)

In treatment I tried to keep up dental grooming but sometimes it was days between flossing. Since I rarely ate, it wasn’t a big deal. But, one thing I didn’t consider was that my mouth was always dry even when I drank liquids. So here I am one year after treatment and my dentist is having expensive talks with me about teeth and gum line issues. Not gingivitis, existing dental implants (from lack of pediatric dentistry).

HEPATITIS C AND DRY MOUTH:

Many drugs cause dry mouth including Hep C drugs and antidepressants.  So what?  Saliva is essential for keeping your mouth clean and lubricated.  Saliva contains enzymes that flush away food and odor-causing bacteria.  So what? A dry mouth is a marvelous arena for bad breath, cavities and mouth infections. Symptoms include:

  • Dry mouth (duh)                                           
  • Cracked lips
  • Difficulty swallowing
  • Difficulty eating dry food
  • Altered sense of taste
  • Plaque, decay, gum disease
  • Sores or cracks at corners of mouth
  • Sore throat
  • Oh yes, increased risk of head and neck cancer

Harsh terrain

Remembering to sip water every fifteen minutes was out of the question, so I sucked on sugar-free hard candy and chewed sugar-free gum.  Obviously this didn’t save my oral cavity.  My dentist says I have a geographic tongue.  I will leave that statement alone.

Okay I have created a new entry for your list of “Shit that doesn’t work“.  Now what?

GlaxoSmithKline claims to have the elixir for all your dry mouth angst.  Biotene is a triad of gel, mouthwash and toothpaste.  My dentist gave me a sample of the triple threat. My experience has been short-term relief, maybe that is the best Biotene can do.

BTW, it has been over a year since treatment but I am still on antidepressants and still have a dry mouth.  Dang.

http://www.biotene.com

http://www.nuvorainc.com/salese

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/813283

http://www.hcvadvocate.org/hepatitis/hepC/hepatitis_coordinators.html

Hepatitis C Treatment: The Big Sleep In The Rabbit Hole

Going through treatment of Hepatitis C, I suspended reality. 

My world became a rabbit hole.  More like a depressed Bugs Bunny than Alice.

The first on-screen appearance of Bugs Bunny, ...
The first on-screen appearance of Bugs Bunny, from an unrestored version of the cartoon. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Only my husband Spanky, the psychiatrist and the research nurse could check on me.  But frequently I pulled the hole in on myself and stayed there.  It was kinda weird.   I felt safe from others but not my crazy mind.  I couldn’t close the rabbit hole fast enough to keep out my mind.   Sometimes I felt like I was watching the world through a window but  I couldn’t remember what happened that day.

Memories of coming out of a bar when the sun is still bright, eewww.

Twice stolen from Edvard Munch

Twice stolen from Edvard Munch

malavula.blogspot.com

I used to wonder if other study patients felt the same as me.  I would watch in the waiting room.  But they weren’t giving up their secrets.  Each traveling with his own rabbit hole.

Rabbit Hole Urban Dictionary
Alice in…Metaphor for the conceptual path which is thought to lead to the true nature of reality. Infinitesimally deep and complex, venturing too far down is probably not that great of an idea.
An allusion to Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland. To go “down the rabbithole” is to enter a period of chaos or confusion.
Or to take acid, Deb
…….
Then the study ended.  As drugs began to leach out of my body, I felt like I took a year-long nap.  Only I wasn’t asleep.  I was waking from a little tiny world.  Like a newly released guest of the penal system or someone from the space station, I heard about stuff while in my pseudo-sleep but hadn’t really grasped it.  Politics, friends, life skills, I had to catch up on it all. This is more difficult than you think, trying to get past all the celebrity crap. Who “gets” celebrity crap?  I don’t but somebody must or it wouldn’t be ubiquitous.
Sometimes I want to crawl back down the rabbit hole.  During those times, I hang out in our guest room, my home during treatment.  It’s comforting in a psychiatric kind of way.  It took months to feel free of that need,  about four half-lives*  When I can’t sleep I still go in there.  It is normal to lie awake all night in the rabbit hole.
 I’m thinking of painting the rabbit hole room lavender (I don’t like lavender) or getting a new bed (I like the existing bed).  Dismantle the tangible rabbit hole.
*A half-life, t1/2, is the time it takes to remove 1/2 of a drug from your system.  To approach 100% drug removal takes about six half-lives.

A biological half-life or elimination half-life is the time it takes for a substance (drug, radioactive nuclide, or other) to lose one-half of its pharmacologic, physiologic, or radiological activity. In a medical context, the half-life may also describe the time that it takes for the concentration in blood plasma of a substance to reach one-half of its steady-state value (the “plasma half-life”)

Hepatitis C Treatment Management: What would Mamaw Do? WWMD?

Mamaw and Papaw’s Wedding Day 1916 Livingston KY

The world of Hepatitis C treatment  is more than taking drugs as scheduled and hoping for virus death.  The bigger part is keeping  your body, mind and soul with you.

  • Diarrhea?  Water and Lomotil I guess, that was never my problem
  • Nausea?  Water, saltines and Phenergan
  • Constipation?  Water and stool softener.  Even the name is too gross.  Kinda like mud-butt
  • Mouth Sores?  Water then swish and spit Mylanta.  Happy to spit
  • Food taste like pennies? Water and floss, floss, floss, brush, brush, brush.  Still doesn’t help
  • Flu symptoms for six months?  Water then alternate Tylenol and Advil for six months.  Exercise: yeah, right
  • Rash? Benadryl oral and topical.  Maybe hydrocortisone/vaseline
  • Insomnia?  Ambien if you are lucky.  Benadryl if you are unlucky, it adds to constipation and taste of pennies.  Don’t drink water before bed
  • Depression? Water and SSRIs/SNRIs/antipsychotics/and on-and-on in couplets
  • Too tired to work?   Adderall if  the shaking won’t vibrate your loose screws
  • Can’t go on?  Cry really hard, take Advil, drink water and go on.

My Mamaw had eleven children in Eastern Kentucky  starting in 1917.  There was no doctor, drug store or money.  She lost two baby boys, one to the Spanish Flu.  When she came out of delirium, baby Bentley was already buried.

If an artery spurted, she applied coal soot.  Got a burn?  First well water (cold) then let egg white dry on burn or apply a slice of onion.  Step on a nail?  Clean and soak with turpentine.   Pneumonia?  Inhale kerosene (dosing was tough) through a moist cloth and put a mustard plaster on your chest.  It will kill you or cure you.  I never witnessed this  one.  Croup?  Make a sheet tent over the steam kettle, put in Vick’s and then hold the child under the tent.  If that treatment doesn’t work, sugar with a drop of kerosene. Give a few drops of whiskey if you got it.

a dose of pee

Here’s what applied to us grandkids. Pinworms?  Check rectum at night with a flashlight then give all the kids a stinky medicine that I think had tobacco in it.   Earache?  Warm up pee in a teaspoon a little more than body temp  and pour it in your ear. Stick in a plug of quilting. I would hide in the cedar closet  as long as I could before telling Mamaw.  I made her use my pee.  Here is the thing: it worked. Pee is sterile upon leaving the urinary tract.  Of course I knew nothing of a “clean catch”.  Collection was easier when we got an indoor bathroom.  You figure it out.  When I checked the internet for possible mechanisms of action (MOA) of the pee, there was a claim that urine is an antifungal.  Of course on the internet you can probably find a claim that golf balls extract is good for an earache too.  I made that up.

Mamaw’s rocker and sock monkey

What would Mamaw do about Hepatitis C treatment management?  Probably just rock me and say “Doggone it.  It’ll get better.”    I have her rocker in my house.  It sure is smaller than I remember.  Anyway,  it doesn’t really work without her.

Hepatitis C: Beware the Jabberwok

 Hepatitis C:  Beware the Jabberwok

Through the Looking Glass

‘Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
Did gyre and gimble in the wabe:
All mimsy were the borogoves,
And the mome raths outgrabe.

‘Beware the Jabberwock, my son!
The jaws that bite, the claws that catch!
Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun
The frumious Bandersnatch!’

He took his vorpal sword in hand:
Long time the manxome foe he sought 
So rested he by the Tumtum tree,
And stood a while in thought.

And, as in uffish thought he stood,
The Jabberwock, with eyes of flame,
Came whiffling through the tulgey wood,
And burbled as it came!

One two! One two! And through and through
The vorpal blade went snicker-snack!
He left it dead, and with its head
He went galumphing back.

‘And hast thou slain the Jabberwock?
Come to my arms, my beamish boy!
Oh frabjous day! Callooh! Callay!’
He chortled in his joy.

‘Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
Did gyre and gimble in the wabe:
All mimsy were the borogoves,
And the mome raths outgrabe.    

  

If you listen to a scientific lecture for an hour, you can begin to believe nonsense is science, but don’t.

I believe that the average Hep C patient (whoever that is) has a triple cross to bear.     1. You feel like shit on a stick  2. You have to go to unimaginable places like a liver biopsy suite and 3.You are thrown into a parallel universe where the language is almost understandable, but not really. It’s Jabberwok.

I was listening to a lecture yesterday on Hepatitis A through E. I was reading the slides as Dr. Nice Lady from pharmacy was talking.  And then I heard it:Hepatitis B and C are predominately associated with percutaneous and permucosal transmission”.  Translation:  Hep B and C can be caught through blood and through sexual contact.  Permucosal  is medical lingo for via mucous membranes.  The problem was that fifty pharmacists were about to  leave the lecture and tell their worlds that you can catch Hep C through sex.  I couldn’t let that happen so I said through the chat box “Hep C can be caught through sexual contact?  Is this new information?”  She said no, you are right to point that out, it is not transmitted that way.  So why did she say it?  The slide looked better that way.

In reality, the way one gets Hep C through sex is through rough sex and I mean rough.  Percutaneous means blood transmission.  I will pause here so that you create your own image.

Now I was willing to let it slide when she said that Hepatitis A and E were transmitted through the oral-fecal route.  In reality it is fecal-oral route.  Think about that for a moment.  But my point is that there is a lot of slightly non-true information out there.  What can you do about it?  Ask questions wherever you go.  Even if you have asked the same question before.  Remember how your doctor’s office always has that sign in English and Spanish that says Questions/Pregunta?  They really want you to ask.

Boy, did spellcheck light up Jabberwok!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jabberwocky

Lewis Carroll Through the Looking Glass

Viral Hepatitis:  Keeping Your Patients Safe www.freece.com

Hepatitis C Now Godzillaprevir and KingKongViracide: Yes but is Interferon Still in the Mix?

GodzillaPrevir

KingkongViracide

No matter how powerful add-on drugs are, if Interferon is still part of the mix, many patients will not be able to finish the treatment.  If I was in early stages of Hepatitis C with minimal liver scarring, I would wait 12-24 months for new treatments sans Interferon.  If my Hepatitis C were more advanced, I would go to www.clinicaltrials.gov and type in my disease and city. (Note disclaimer at end of blog)

Below are “press releases” from companies and are mostly targeted to investors, e.g. The market for treating hepatitis C has burgeoned  (My spellchecker doesn’t recognize this as a word) in the last year.

Always look at the source of medical information, if it is Kiss Your Assets Good-Bye or Liver Heard on the Street, run away. If it is the New England Journal of Medicine, or Gastroenterology proceed with caution and a jaundiced eye.  Oops a hepatitis pun.

Dec 1, 2011 – Novel Hep C Treatment Excludes Peginterferon Alfa By: DENISE NAPOLI, Internal Medicine News Digital Network Therapy with a novel

But then if I didn’t read the business news, I wouldn’t know about this for another couple of days:

Bristol-Myers Drops Hepatitis C Drug After Patient Death

Daniel Acker/Bloomberg

Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. has abandoned an experimental hepatitis C pill it bought for $2.5 billion earlier this year after one patient died and others were hospitalized while taking the drug in a study.

                    

Bristol-Myers will take a charge of $1.8 billion in the third quarter related to research and development of the therapy, the New York-based company said in a regulatory filing today. The drugmaker suspended testing the medicine, known as BMS-986094, on Aug. 1 after a patient developed heart failure.

Bristol-Myers said yesterday it has discontinued development of the drug, part of a class of medicines called nucleotide polymerase inhibitors, and was consulting with U.S. regulators to assess the treatment’s effects. Along with the death, eight patients suffered from heart and kidney toxicity, the company said in a statement.

“Bristol-Myers paid a fortune for a pearl that turns out to be fake,” said Erik Gordon, a University of Michigan businessprofessor who follows the health industry, in an e-mail today, referring to the company’s “string of pearls” name for its acquisition strategy. “The Inhibitex acquisition shows the dangers of paying huge premiums for late-stage drug candidates in hot areas. They still can fail.”

I love it:  The dangers of paying huge premiums…Not the dangers of participating in clinical trials. No disrespect to business people, just a different perspective.  I should know, I worked in Big Pharma for twenty-five years.  First make money for share holders, then do no harm to patients.

dictionary.reference.com/browse/inherent existing in someone or something as a permanent and inseparable element, quality, or attribute:

There is inherent risk for patients in clinical trials.  You can quote me on that.