Liver Fibrosis Testing Improvements

Image

Don't forget your lipstick

Don’t forget your lipstick

Cirrhosis is a chronic lesion with the accumulation of scar tissue and that alters the structure and function of the liver. Once a patient is cured of Hepatitis C, the danger is not over if the liver is heavily scarred. Currently there is no cure or reversal agent for cirrhosis short of a transplant.

 

 

As cirrhosis progresses, the liver tries to heal itself but the cycle builds scar tissue upon scar tissue and blood cannot flow through the liver. This causes a backup of blood which causes portal hypertension (high blood pressure of the liver). This is incompatible with life. When the liver cannot filter blood, the body compensates by growing vessels around the liver to move blood. And life threatening consequences occur. Frequent results are the pathological creation of blood vessels, ruptured veins in the stomach and esophagus, the inability to stop bleeding, liver cancer, therefore death.

In the past, treatments have targeted blood vessel growth to prevent new weak blood vessels that burst under pressure.

  • Drugs that stop blood vessel growth, do the same thing in the brain and throughout the body so the blocking of VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) receptors is damaging to normal blood vessel growth.
  • Most therapies are delivered by blood, but since the liver is scarred, the drugs bypass the liver and sight of inflammation and scar tissue.

Sounds complicated doesn’t it?  Well if you have received treatment for Hepatitis C, you already have a working knowledge of the liver.

Scientists say as the liver attempts to repair itself, the new nodules have high levels of CPEB4 protein and these new nodules form liver cancer cells. CBEP4 has been linked to blood vessel growth in brain and pancreatic cancers. By blocking CBEP4, normal vascular cells grow but the damaged nodules don’t. These experiments have been performed in cells in vitro, animals, and in sample tissue from patients with cirrhosis.

The researchers are working on the role of blocking proteins, and possible treatments for liver carcinomas. Currently liver carcinomas are the main liver cancer and the third deadliest cancer world-wide, with a 5-year survival rate of less than 10%.

In another study a team at The Salk Institute has identified a molecule, JQ1, which has shown promise in the prevention as well as reversal of liver fibrosis in animals. This molecule interferes with the master regulator of liver fibrosis, BRD4. This treatment is at the gene level, and works to block fibrosis formation for patients with cirrhosis from alcoholism and hepatitis. Currently JQ1 is a prototype of a new class of drugs tested in human clinical trials for various cancers.1,2

 https://heplikeme.wordpress.com/wp-admin/media-upload.php?post_id=1099&type=image&TB_iframe=1

view references

  1. Gastroenterology (2015) doi: 10.1053/j.gastro.2015.11.038
  2. Scientists in Barcelona discover a potential treatment for cirrhosis. Institute for Research in Biomedicine Barcelona. Published December 11, 2015.

This article is also published in https://hepatitisc.net/living/fibrosis-and-cirrhosis-news/  Please visit  Hepatitis C News  for more topics

Hepatitis C Research: What’s a Phase and How Can We Get through it Faster?

Hepatitis C:  Current Research Drugs

Picture your liver at the center of the Milky Way. Now, the swirling stars are treatments, some closer than others.  Drug studies are in orbit like this.  Work with me here.

Your Liver = Center of your universe.

Illustration of the Milky Way by Dianna Marquee

Illustration of the Milky Way by Dianna Marquee

Filed = Closest stars, drugs waiting on FDA approval.  The red tape wheels grind on.

Phase III = Next out, drugs being tested large-scale for safety and efficacy.  Will the virus die before you do?

Phase II = Further away from your liver, drugs shown not to kill  people when tested on a small group of sick patients. Cohort is the word.  This was me during round two of treatment.  Kind of risky here.

Phase I =  Compounds (drugs) that don’t kill healthy people crazy enough to volunteer (broke students and new parolees)

Preclinical =A blur of solar dust = test tube, computer chemical structuring, animal studies. Yep, animal testing.

When I was first diagnosed in 1991 with Hepatitis C, there was only one binary star, Interferon and Ribavirin.  Finally in 2011  came Telaprevir  and Boceprevir. That’s a long time between hits, 20 years.  Now the Hep C universe is almost getting crowded, but not yet.  The issue is safety and timelines.  The barbaric days of Interferon could be phased out (pun intended).

Phases of  Current Drug Research:  Thanks go to Dr Paul Kwo for this slide

Paul Y. Kwo, MD, is Associate Professor of Medicine and Medical Director of Liver Transplantation in the Gastroenterology/Hepatology Division of Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis

Paul Y. Kwo, MD, is Associate Professor of Medicine and Medical Director of Liver Transplantation in the Gastroenterology/Hepatology Division of Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis

So, this slide represents current studies, phases  and the mechanism of action (MOA).  Remember that we want at least two drugs with different MOAs in our bodies to avoid virus mutation and resistance.  The good news is that there are multiple drug candidates in each category.  For further information on any study, go to www.clinicaltrials.gov and enter the drug/compound name.  This site will also tell you if the study is enrolling patients and if there is a location close to you.  This website rocks.  Thank you federal government.

The US research system is business-based, where competition for the patent drives the process.  I’m not completely opposed to this system.  But it does have drawbacks.

Remember when AIDS researchers were competing to isolate the culprit?  France and the US,  it was crazy.  The two groups still argue about whom was first with what.

The HBO movie And The Band Played On documents government and cultural barriers to a disease connected with a cohort that isn’t mainstream, i.e. HIV and homosexual men.  I’m glad the barriers came down a bit faster with Hep C.  Initially the cohort was alcoholics and drug addicts.  But then the target audience became baby boomers.  This was 1. More acceptable and 2. A bigger pool of patients and potential profit.

Obviously the slide above is the star of this blog.    Drug companies race to be first with a new drug(s).  So why am I speaking of other things?  Because I think the days of working in a research vacuum are limited.  American drug companies say this is bad.  They claim without financial incentive, research will dry up.

But, wouldn’t it be great if companies worked together and combined research efforts?  I know, that is a big but.  I like big buts…There are novel initiatives include partnering between governmental organizations and industry. The world’s largest such initiative is the Innovative Medicines Initiative (IMI), and examples of major national initiatives are Top Institute Pharma in the Netherlands and Biopeople in Denmark.  In the USA it could be the National Institutes of Health (NIH).  We used to joke that NIH meant “Not Investigated Here”  meaning that the USA insists on its own research.  Only science types would joke about such topics. No wonder we have a reputation.

Paul Y. Kwo, MD, is Associate Professor of Medicine

Paul Y. Kwo, MD, is Associate Professor of Medicine

Now picture these studies sharing data.  Think of all the time and patient suffering saved by quickly identifying drug-drug and drug-disease interactions.  Think about how the winners would rise to the top.  I don’t care about the political/social overtones.  I am just thinking about patients. This is already happening with cancer research.

I have worked on this blog for a week and still can’t get it right.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virus

http://www.chronicliverdisease.org/COEE/index.cfm?id=PKwo

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drug_development

http://voices.yahoo.com/a-summary-film-band-played-on-127287.html

Hepatitis C: Beware the Jabberwok

 Hepatitis C:  Beware the Jabberwok

Through the Looking Glass

‘Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
Did gyre and gimble in the wabe:
All mimsy were the borogoves,
And the mome raths outgrabe.

‘Beware the Jabberwock, my son!
The jaws that bite, the claws that catch!
Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun
The frumious Bandersnatch!’

He took his vorpal sword in hand:
Long time the manxome foe he sought 
So rested he by the Tumtum tree,
And stood a while in thought.

And, as in uffish thought he stood,
The Jabberwock, with eyes of flame,
Came whiffling through the tulgey wood,
And burbled as it came!

One two! One two! And through and through
The vorpal blade went snicker-snack!
He left it dead, and with its head
He went galumphing back.

‘And hast thou slain the Jabberwock?
Come to my arms, my beamish boy!
Oh frabjous day! Callooh! Callay!’
He chortled in his joy.

‘Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
Did gyre and gimble in the wabe:
All mimsy were the borogoves,
And the mome raths outgrabe.    

  

If you listen to a scientific lecture for an hour, you can begin to believe nonsense is science, but don’t.

I believe that the average Hep C patient (whoever that is) has a triple cross to bear.     1. You feel like shit on a stick  2. You have to go to unimaginable places like a liver biopsy suite and 3.You are thrown into a parallel universe where the language is almost understandable, but not really. It’s Jabberwok.

I was listening to a lecture yesterday on Hepatitis A through E. I was reading the slides as Dr. Nice Lady from pharmacy was talking.  And then I heard it:Hepatitis B and C are predominately associated with percutaneous and permucosal transmission”.  Translation:  Hep B and C can be caught through blood and through sexual contact.  Permucosal  is medical lingo for via mucous membranes.  The problem was that fifty pharmacists were about to  leave the lecture and tell their worlds that you can catch Hep C through sex.  I couldn’t let that happen so I said through the chat box “Hep C can be caught through sexual contact?  Is this new information?”  She said no, you are right to point that out, it is not transmitted that way.  So why did she say it?  The slide looked better that way.

In reality, the way one gets Hep C through sex is through rough sex and I mean rough.  Percutaneous means blood transmission.  I will pause here so that you create your own image.

Now I was willing to let it slide when she said that Hepatitis A and E were transmitted through the oral-fecal route.  In reality it is fecal-oral route.  Think about that for a moment.  But my point is that there is a lot of slightly non-true information out there.  What can you do about it?  Ask questions wherever you go.  Even if you have asked the same question before.  Remember how your doctor’s office always has that sign in English and Spanish that says Questions/Pregunta?  They really want you to ask.

Boy, did spellcheck light up Jabberwok!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jabberwocky

Lewis Carroll Through the Looking Glass

Viral Hepatitis:  Keeping Your Patients Safe www.freece.com

Why do you think they call it a LIVEr?

HepLikeMe: recovering from hepatitis treatment

If we didn’t need our livers to live, why are they named LIVEr?

If you have Hepatitis C and are reading this blog, I assume you have a working knowledge of this disease.  If not, there are great sites such as

http://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/C/index.htm

and crap sites where lay people talk out their irresponsible asses.  If a statement starts with “I feel”, “I think” or “This herb won’t hurt, it is organic/ natural” run away.

My daughter tells me I have always been a bit ahead of the curve.  She says I am hep. I moved to the country and painted my mailbox blue before it was hep.   I got sober before it was hep. You get the idea. BTW hep is better than hip because Cab Calloway said it.

I like to type BTW.  You have been warned.

Indeed, Hepatitis C has now become main stream

http://www.chron.com/default/article/CDC-mulls-hepatitis-C-testing-for-boomers-3550384.php

I have just completed round two of treatment for Hepatitis C genotype 1.  Is the treatment worse than the disease?  No, but  that is difficult to grasp when you are asymptomatic.  Or at least you are ignoring symptoms.  This round sucked less of my life out of me, only because I brought the experience of round one.  Sounds like a prize fight. TKO I was technically knocked out by round one. I didn’t care after a while.  A new experience for me.

In order to survive, one must care.  The treatment says fuck it.  Don’t fuck it

In 2007 I began my first, and what I thought was my only, round of treatment for Hepatitis C.  The treatment, Pegylated Interferon and Ribavirin, did not clear the virus (we don’t say cure.  That is for hams).  What it did do was kick my ass to the curb.  The recovery was longer than the treatment and I never did get back to where I was.  All of my depression and insecurities bubbled up.  Depression is so depressing, insecurities so insecure.

In 2011 I began treatment with Interferon, Ribavirin, and two antiviral study drugs from Gilead Pharmaceuticals. Each drug attacks a different site in the virus life cycle. Early on there was no detectable virus.  Still not.  My treatment ended after a short (wink wink) 24 weeks.

Background:

In 1992 I donated blood and got a letter in the mail from the blood bank saying “you’re a winner.  You have Hepatitis C.  Please don’t give us your blood again.”  I was a winner.  No further information.  I went on with my life but didn’t donate blood and made it clear that my organs are not a gift to the living.  There was no proactive information regarding this disease and I had not exposed my liver to toxins in years.   I went underground with my secret.  Ironies abound. Forward a few years. I worked in Medical Affairs for a large pharmaceutical company, and my field of expertise was gastroenterology.  So, having access to the top research hepatologists, I had a liver biopsy performed for base line.  Marvelous results, you are great, minimal inflammation, no scarring or activity.  Go away and check back if things change.  Whatever that means.  I saved myself for new therapies.  I was treatment naive in the lingo. I love it when I can say words like naive.  There are web sites to define phase and staging of liver biopsies.  Bottom line,  Inconsistent

In 2007 during an annual physical, (which the AMA is now discouraging) my liver enzymes were elevated.  My internist wanted to send me to the local gastroenterologist, but me being Dr Science, I said no way.  And I pursued another research hepatologist.  Had another biopsy, phase one grade one activity.  Options, ignore or don’t. By then there was a minute amount of data indicating that maybe older patients (> 50) should go ahead and get treated.  That would be me.  Amazingly, there were no new available treatments.  So, I went to the government site www.clinicaltrials.gov , and entered my disease and city. Voila, there was a site with a randomized trial comparing Standard of Care (SOC) to SOC plus telaprevir.  This site was affiliated with a gastroenterology department at a medical school where I had a relationship (not relations) with the head of Gastroenterology/Hepatology. This DID NOT influence my ability to enter the trial.  But because of that relationship, I had confidence in and respect for the quality of research.

Enough for today.  This is a lot of work.

Deb