The Depression Road Goes On Forever and The Party Never Ends *

Hepatitis C and Depression: I should be weary of this subject, but I’m only weary of depression. Thirteen months ago I completed a clinical trial for Hepatitis C. I was cured, c-u-r-e-d.

 GS-US-256-0124-A Phase 2B, Trial Evaluating Using Combinations of Oral Antivirals (GS-5885, GS-9451), PegInterferon Α and Ribavirin In Treatment Experienced Subjects  With Chronic Genotype 1 Hepatitis C Virus Infection

Last month I went in for my one-year follow-up visit where it was confirmed “No Virus After One Year!”.  Okay, maybe it’s true.  Maybe. I answered questions about my mental well-being.  I felt great and said so.  Later I remembered that I felt great because I was on two anti-depressant drugs, Lexapro (escitalopram)  and Wellbutrin (bupropion XL) with a splash of trazodone at bedtime.

BTW, I think everyone should speak about their antidepressants. I know there’s a bunch of us out there.  Just look at the sales $$$.     I worked for Lilly when they launched Prozac.  Rather than get it for free, I paid at the retail pharmacy because I didn’t want anyone to know.  That’s Bull Corn.  Bull Corn?  Where did that come from?

Where was I?  So two weeks ago, my psychiatrist,  (who treats Hep C patients) began to decrease the Lexapro with the goal of decreasing my antidepressant load.  My scaffolding crumbled under me and I spiraled into an anxiety-ridden, weeping insomniac in just a few days and nights.

I've come undone
I’ve come undone

.So,  I am miserable and looking at increasing drugs.  My first thought was that I am FUBAR (Fucked Up Beyond All Reason/Recognition/Repair  military slang) and that’s that.  My second thought was to work closely with Dr _ who assures me that this is a minor setback. Minor to someone else maybe. How quickly I become self-absorbed.

Now, after 400 words, the reason for this blog.  Today I received this article from  Medscape.

 Psychiatric Treatment Considerations With Direct Acting Antivirals in Hepatitis C   Sanjeev Sockalingam, Alice Tseng, Pierre Giguere, David Wong
BMC Gastroenterol. 2013;13(86)

(Newly published articles in my areas of interest for August 9, 2013: Medscape)

Can’t resist the title can you?  I know I can’t.

Being a Doctor of Pharmacy and a scientist, I love articles like this. It takes my entire nineteen years of schooling to follow the data dump. Gastroenterologists and Psychiatrists won’t read this article. It falls into a discrete category that gets filtered out during literature searches. DAAs means previrs ( boceprevir / telaprevir).

Abstract

Background Despite recent advances in hepatitis C (HCV) treatment, specifically the addition of direct acting antivirals (DAAs), pegylated interferon-alpha remains the backbone of HCV therapy. Therefore, the impact of DAAs on the management of co-morbid psychiatric illness and neuropsychiatric sequelae remains an ongoing concern during HCV therapy. This paper provides a review of the neuropsychiatric adverse effects of DAAs and drug-drug interactions (DDIs) between DAAs and psychiatric medications.

Methods We conducted a PubMed search using relevant search terms and hand searched reference lists of related review articles. In addition, we searched abstracts for major hepatology conferences and contacted respective pharmaceutical companies for additional studies.

Results Limited data is available on the neuropsychiatric adverse effects of DAAs; however, data from major clinical trials suggest that DAAs have minimal neuropsychiatric risk. DAAs can potentially interact with a variety of psychotropic agents via cytochrome P450 and p-glycoprotein interactions. Triazolam, oral midazolam, St. John’s Wort, carbamazepine and pimozide, are contraindicated with DAAs. DDIs between DAAs and antidepressants, anxiolytics, hypnotics, mood stabilizers, antipsychotics and treatments for opioid dependence are summarized.

Conclusions Although DAAs do not add significant neuropsychiatric risk, the potential for DDIs is high. Consideration of DDIs is paramount to improving medication adherence and mitigating adverse effects during HCV therapy.

So the abstract  (I saved you from the entire article)  kinda says: We don’t know enough to draw any conclusions so we caution you when using any drugs metabolized by the liver, including antidepressants. Terms: pharmacokinetics (where the drug goes in your body and how your body changes it to water-soluble (pee), or fat-soluble (poop) to get rid of the drug:  pharmacodynamics , what the drug does to your body to heal you and how it does it. This is for one drug. Think about a bunch of drugs where the liver and maybe kidneys do not work well.  There is a traffic jam and a couple of fights at the entry to your liver and the drugs build up in your blood.   Crash.

This is a year of my life

CPY 450 System, took me years

And so I say to you what any good or bad pharmacist would say:  “Caveat Emptor”.  Actually,  the pharmacist will put warning stickers all over the bottle and give you a packet of small print information.  Then she will make you sign that you have been counseled.

Beware the Jabberwok

Caveat Emptor

* A nod to the awesome Robert Earl Keen Jr. http://www.metrolyrics.com/the-road-goes-on-forever-lyrics-robert-earl-keen.html

http://www.hcvadvocate.org/hepatitis/factsheets_pdf/HCV_Neg.pdf  This is awesome for those like me.

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/807927?src=wnl_edit_tpal&uac=190805DY

Hepatitis C Research: What’s a Phase and How Can We Get through it Faster?

Hepatitis C:  Current Research Drugs

Picture your liver at the center of the Milky Way. Now, the swirling stars are treatments, some closer than others.  Drug studies are in orbit like this.  Work with me here.

Your Liver = Center of your universe.

Illustration of the Milky Way by Dianna Marquee

Illustration of the Milky Way by Dianna Marquee

Filed = Closest stars, drugs waiting on FDA approval.  The red tape wheels grind on.

Phase III = Next out, drugs being tested large-scale for safety and efficacy.  Will the virus die before you do?

Phase II = Further away from your liver, drugs shown not to kill  people when tested on a small group of sick patients. Cohort is the word.  This was me during round two of treatment.  Kind of risky here.

Phase I =  Compounds (drugs) that don’t kill healthy people crazy enough to volunteer (broke students and new parolees)

Preclinical =A blur of solar dust = test tube, computer chemical structuring, animal studies. Yep, animal testing.

When I was first diagnosed in 1991 with Hepatitis C, there was only one binary star, Interferon and Ribavirin.  Finally in 2011  came Telaprevir  and Boceprevir. That’s a long time between hits, 20 years.  Now the Hep C universe is almost getting crowded, but not yet.  The issue is safety and timelines.  The barbaric days of Interferon could be phased out (pun intended).

Phases of  Current Drug Research:  Thanks go to Dr Paul Kwo for this slide

Paul Y. Kwo, MD, is Associate Professor of Medicine and Medical Director of Liver Transplantation in the Gastroenterology/Hepatology Division of Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis

Paul Y. Kwo, MD, is Associate Professor of Medicine and Medical Director of Liver Transplantation in the Gastroenterology/Hepatology Division of Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis

So, this slide represents current studies, phases  and the mechanism of action (MOA).  Remember that we want at least two drugs with different MOAs in our bodies to avoid virus mutation and resistance.  The good news is that there are multiple drug candidates in each category.  For further information on any study, go to www.clinicaltrials.gov and enter the drug/compound name.  This site will also tell you if the study is enrolling patients and if there is a location close to you.  This website rocks.  Thank you federal government.

The US research system is business-based, where competition for the patent drives the process.  I’m not completely opposed to this system.  But it does have drawbacks.

Remember when AIDS researchers were competing to isolate the culprit?  France and the US,  it was crazy.  The two groups still argue about whom was first with what.

The HBO movie And The Band Played On documents government and cultural barriers to a disease connected with a cohort that isn’t mainstream, i.e. HIV and homosexual men.  I’m glad the barriers came down a bit faster with Hep C.  Initially the cohort was alcoholics and drug addicts.  But then the target audience became baby boomers.  This was 1. More acceptable and 2. A bigger pool of patients and potential profit.

Obviously the slide above is the star of this blog.    Drug companies race to be first with a new drug(s).  So why am I speaking of other things?  Because I think the days of working in a research vacuum are limited.  American drug companies say this is bad.  They claim without financial incentive, research will dry up.

But, wouldn’t it be great if companies worked together and combined research efforts?  I know, that is a big but.  I like big buts…There are novel initiatives include partnering between governmental organizations and industry. The world’s largest such initiative is the Innovative Medicines Initiative (IMI), and examples of major national initiatives are Top Institute Pharma in the Netherlands and Biopeople in Denmark.  In the USA it could be the National Institutes of Health (NIH).  We used to joke that NIH meant “Not Investigated Here”  meaning that the USA insists on its own research.  Only science types would joke about such topics. No wonder we have a reputation.

Paul Y. Kwo, MD, is Associate Professor of Medicine

Paul Y. Kwo, MD, is Associate Professor of Medicine

Now picture these studies sharing data.  Think of all the time and patient suffering saved by quickly identifying drug-drug and drug-disease interactions.  Think about how the winners would rise to the top.  I don’t care about the political/social overtones.  I am just thinking about patients. This is already happening with cancer research.

I have worked on this blog for a week and still can’t get it right.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virus

http://www.chronicliverdisease.org/COEE/index.cfm?id=PKwo

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drug_development

http://voices.yahoo.com/a-summary-film-band-played-on-127287.html

And Now For Something Completely Predictable: Law Suits with Hepatitis C Treatments

Hepatitis C Research:  This  trend to law suits was completely predictable, but right?  I think not.  In the words of a friend of mine “Fuck me, what do I know?”

Artwork:  Lapland Hand

I don’t know the answers, so I raise my hand to ask

Hepatitis C patients want to sue drug companies post  research treatment, claiming permanent emotional and mental damage. How do they know which came first? 

  Here is one site I found while looking into the topic, www.lloydwright.org    At the end you will note an absence of comment from me. I don’t know why I am lacking compassion. Am I a patient?  Am I a scientist?   

http://lloydwright.org/messages/content/i-was-better-hepatitis-c  I was better off with the Hepatitis C!

Name:

Mariel

Your Question for Lloyd

I was wondering how I get involved in the class action against interferon. While taking the drug, I dropped down to 79 lbs, and now have Gastroparesis and Crohns disease as a result.

The interferon paralyzed my stomach, and I am considering having a pacemaker put in because I am constantly vomitting and nausea us, and dropping dramatic weight. I am on disability because of this, and its caused me immense mental distress, as well as my daughters.

Please tell me what I need to do to get involved. I can not work and there for am unable to provide the life I wanted. I was better off with the hepatitis C! 🙂

I have just finished taking Interferon and Ribavirin for Hep C

I have just finished taking Interferon and Ribavirin for Hep C. I took it for 6 months and was cured of HEP C; however, no my liver and kidneys are suffering. Two months ago I had a perfect liver besides some fat. Now, I have Cirrhosis spots and the dr. said it has acquired 2 YEARS of damage in 30 days.
I was wondering if there was any lawsuit I could join or any other programs? I now am facing cancer most likely and have 4 children and nothing to leave behind to help them.
Thanks you. -Jim Thomas

Long Term Sides that ruined my life after hep c treatment

i WANT TO SUE FOR PAIN AND SUFFERING!!!!!

Can you help direct me?  “They never told me that I would be disabled permenantly when I treated in 2006,  My nervous system is a mess.  I have severe panic attacks, depression, eyesight is really bad, still ache all over, agoraphobia.   This has brought me down from being a productive & employed ‘to being below poverty level (cause I’m unstable i cannot hold a job for long) and I have been on the brinks of homelessness for the passed months;  I’ve been suffering since 2006.

This treatment ruined my life!

Sent: Thursday, November 10, 2011 3:55 PM To: LloydWright Subject: [Contact Lloyd] Severe disability resulting from Interferon + Ribavirin treatment in 2003. I was never warned and I’m seeking legal advice and/or recourse
_Smith sent a message using the contact form at  http://lloydwright.org/messages/contact.
post Interferon nightmare

In September 2008 I started Peg Interferon. I stopped after 6 months. Here is my story:
My name is Nick I am a now 30 year old father of an almost three year old little girl named _____. ( D.O.B.: ) and husband of a 32 year old wife named _____  (D.O.B.: ) I was 27 going on 28 years old when I found out I got the Hep. C Virus. About 6 months to a year before that I was giving plasma every 6 months until finally the next time I went in to give it I found out that recently I caught the Hep. C virus.

phase II clinical trial SOC and Boceprevir – Join the Suit

Lloyd Wright, An email friend referred your site. I am currently in a federal law suit for permanent injury sustained from my participation in a clinical trial of PegIntron / Rebetol / Boceprevir. I suffer multi-system sarcoidosis with occular, renal and pulmonary involvement caused by PegIntron and Rebetol treatment.

Lee Prokaska The Hamilton Spectator Canada (Jun 3, 2010)

It is virtually impossible to put an accurate and true dollar value on a loved one lost.

But when a mechanism is set up to try to do that, when responsibility is accepted by government, it is unacceptable for families to lose yet again by failing to receive the full compensation they deserve.

Group to sue over hepatitis C

People with hepatitis C have formed a group to sue the government and drugmakers for damages over their infection during mass vaccinations even though they have no clear evidence, such as medical charts.

  www.heplikeme.com

Hepatitis C Treatment Management: What would Mamaw Do? WWMD?

Mamaw and Papaw’s Wedding Day 1916 Livingston KY

The world of Hepatitis C treatment  is more than taking drugs as scheduled and hoping for virus death.  The bigger part is keeping  your body, mind and soul with you.

  • Diarrhea?  Water and Lomotil I guess, that was never my problem
  • Nausea?  Water, saltines and Phenergan
  • Constipation?  Water and stool softener.  Even the name is too gross.  Kinda like mud-butt
  • Mouth Sores?  Water then swish and spit Mylanta.  Happy to spit
  • Food taste like pennies? Water and floss, floss, floss, brush, brush, brush.  Still doesn’t help
  • Flu symptoms for six months?  Water then alternate Tylenol and Advil for six months.  Exercise: yeah, right
  • Rash? Benadryl oral and topical.  Maybe hydrocortisone/vaseline
  • Insomnia?  Ambien if you are lucky.  Benadryl if you are unlucky, it adds to constipation and taste of pennies.  Don’t drink water before bed
  • Depression? Water and SSRIs/SNRIs/antipsychotics/and on-and-on in couplets
  • Too tired to work?   Adderall if  the shaking won’t vibrate your loose screws
  • Can’t go on?  Cry really hard, take Advil, drink water and go on.

My Mamaw had eleven children in Eastern Kentucky  starting in 1917.  There was no doctor, drug store or money.  She lost two baby boys, one to the Spanish Flu.  When she came out of delirium, baby Bentley was already buried.

If an artery spurted, she applied coal soot.  Got a burn?  First well water (cold) then let egg white dry on burn or apply a slice of onion.  Step on a nail?  Clean and soak with turpentine.   Pneumonia?  Inhale kerosene (dosing was tough) through a moist cloth and put a mustard plaster on your chest.  It will kill you or cure you.  I never witnessed this  one.  Croup?  Make a sheet tent over the steam kettle, put in Vick’s and then hold the child under the tent.  If that treatment doesn’t work, sugar with a drop of kerosene. Give a few drops of whiskey if you got it.

a dose of pee

Here’s what applied to us grandkids. Pinworms?  Check rectum at night with a flashlight then give all the kids a stinky medicine that I think had tobacco in it.   Earache?  Warm up pee in a teaspoon a little more than body temp  and pour it in your ear. Stick in a plug of quilting. I would hide in the cedar closet  as long as I could before telling Mamaw.  I made her use my pee.  Here is the thing: it worked. Pee is sterile upon leaving the urinary tract.  Of course I knew nothing of a “clean catch”.  Collection was easier when we got an indoor bathroom.  You figure it out.  When I checked the internet for possible mechanisms of action (MOA) of the pee, there was a claim that urine is an antifungal.  Of course on the internet you can probably find a claim that golf balls extract is good for an earache too.  I made that up.

Mamaw’s rocker and sock monkey

What would Mamaw do about Hepatitis C treatment management?  Probably just rock me and say “Doggone it.  It’ll get better.”    I have her rocker in my house.  It sure is smaller than I remember.  Anyway,  it doesn’t really work without her.

Hepatitis C: Is that a Real Poncho or is that a Sears Poncho?

Mothers of invention, Theatre de Clichy, Paris...

Mothers of invention, Theatre de Clichy, Paris, 1970-1972 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“Look here brother,
Who you jivin’ with that Cosmik Debris?
Now is that a  real poncho or is that a Sears poncho?  Hmmm, no foolin’?”

Frank Zappa and the Mothers of Invention

Do you have a liver doctor (hepatologist) or a gastroenterologist?  Many people start out with a liver doc then over to a local gastro for long-term treatment management.  Kinda like selling your mortgage to a broker that does home mortgaging on the side but commercial financing is his bag.  I know, lame example.

Now a gastroenterologist is trained on the liver but probably hasn’t thought much about it since his fellowship at school.  Why?  Because his specialty is the GI tract (esophagus to anus).  In fact many gastroenterologists spend so much time with endoscopy or colonoscopy, they are refered to as “Scope Monkeys”.   The liver is not part of the GI tube.  No foolin’

Follow the GI tract from esophagus to anus. Then look at the liver.

Members of the two GI national associations, the American Society of Gastroenterology and Endoscopy (ASGE) plus the American College of Gastroenterology (ACG), do not attend meetings with the American  Association of the Study of Liver Disease (AASLD) and visa versa, unless presenting new research data.  But they don’t attend each other’s lectures. I know. For decades I attended the joint meetings of ASGE and ACG. It is difficult for a gastroenterologist to stay current on evolving treatments for Hepatitis C.  And these days the treatment (r)evolution is on.

Two weeks ago the AASLD and the EASL (European Association of the Study of the Liver) met in Prague to discuss Hepatitis C and:

  • Global scale intervention and control of HCV – OK
  • Prospects for a preventive HCV vaccine – OK
  • Review of new drug treatments in development such as Nonnucleoside inhibitors of HCV RNA polymerase, NS5A inhibitors, and Cyclophylin inhibitors – Important to you
  • Effectiveness of triple combinations in cirrhotics Important to a lot of you

Why do I mention this?  Here is an example of why.  Treatment of Hepatitis C is complicated and lasts a long time. The ribavirin induced anemia is treated by dose reductions based on your weight.  If your red blood cells (RBCs) drop below 10 mg/dl, Ribavirin is reduced by 20%.  If the RBC number does not increase in a few weeks, dosing must decrease another 20%.  But the dose cannot drop below 600 mg.  Now adding the protease inhibitors telaprevir and boceprevir,who knows what happens to RBCs in you?  Does the gastroenterologist know that?  Doubtful.  Does he know about the new drugs that work at different sites on the virus?  No.

Your insurance co-pay is probably the same regardless of which specialist  you visit.  Why not go with the real poncho?  BTW I couldn’t find a real poncho, only a Sears type poncho.  No foolin’

References

http://www.songmeanings.net/songs/view/78854/#mjbJdWKO6aRwIzk0.99

http://www2.kenes.com/PRAGUE2012/SCIENTIFIC/Pages/ScientificProgramme.aspx

http://www.natap.org/2012/APASL/APASL_08.htm

http://www.hcvadvocate.org/hepatitis/factsheets_pdf/SEM_anemia.pdf

Hepatitis C: Beware the Jabberwok

 Hepatitis C:  Beware the Jabberwok

Through the Looking Glass

‘Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
Did gyre and gimble in the wabe:
All mimsy were the borogoves,
And the mome raths outgrabe.

‘Beware the Jabberwock, my son!
The jaws that bite, the claws that catch!
Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun
The frumious Bandersnatch!’

He took his vorpal sword in hand:
Long time the manxome foe he sought 
So rested he by the Tumtum tree,
And stood a while in thought.

And, as in uffish thought he stood,
The Jabberwock, with eyes of flame,
Came whiffling through the tulgey wood,
And burbled as it came!

One two! One two! And through and through
The vorpal blade went snicker-snack!
He left it dead, and with its head
He went galumphing back.

‘And hast thou slain the Jabberwock?
Come to my arms, my beamish boy!
Oh frabjous day! Callooh! Callay!’
He chortled in his joy.

‘Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
Did gyre and gimble in the wabe:
All mimsy were the borogoves,
And the mome raths outgrabe.    

  

If you listen to a scientific lecture for an hour, you can begin to believe nonsense is science, but don’t.

I believe that the average Hep C patient (whoever that is) has a triple cross to bear.     1. You feel like shit on a stick  2. You have to go to unimaginable places like a liver biopsy suite and 3.You are thrown into a parallel universe where the language is almost understandable, but not really. It’s Jabberwok.

I was listening to a lecture yesterday on Hepatitis A through E. I was reading the slides as Dr. Nice Lady from pharmacy was talking.  And then I heard it:Hepatitis B and C are predominately associated with percutaneous and permucosal transmission”.  Translation:  Hep B and C can be caught through blood and through sexual contact.  Permucosal  is medical lingo for via mucous membranes.  The problem was that fifty pharmacists were about to  leave the lecture and tell their worlds that you can catch Hep C through sex.  I couldn’t let that happen so I said through the chat box “Hep C can be caught through sexual contact?  Is this new information?”  She said no, you are right to point that out, it is not transmitted that way.  So why did she say it?  The slide looked better that way.

In reality, the way one gets Hep C through sex is through rough sex and I mean rough.  Percutaneous means blood transmission.  I will pause here so that you create your own image.

Now I was willing to let it slide when she said that Hepatitis A and E were transmitted through the oral-fecal route.  In reality it is fecal-oral route.  Think about that for a moment.  But my point is that there is a lot of slightly non-true information out there.  What can you do about it?  Ask questions wherever you go.  Even if you have asked the same question before.  Remember how your doctor’s office always has that sign in English and Spanish that says Questions/Pregunta?  They really want you to ask.

Boy, did spellcheck light up Jabberwok!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jabberwocky

Lewis Carroll Through the Looking Glass

Viral Hepatitis:  Keeping Your Patients Safe www.freece.com

Hepatitis C: Does “No Detectable Virus” Equal Cure Or Is It Smoke?

Am I cured or is it just smoke?

Hepatitis C cure?

 If my hepatitis C virus test shows non-detectable virus 6 months after the end of treatment, am I negative?  Will I  stay negative?  Am I cured?  In the recent past only “non-detectable virus” was declared. Now doctors are adding “cure” to the jargon.  This is with the addition of Incivek and Victrelis, and depending on the discussion.  No two clinical trials are alike and so Hepatitis C researchers use (they say utilize) sustained viralogical response (SVR) to compare outcomes.  Most trial design is by the company developing the drug.  One goal is to ask the study questions just right to get scientific and marketable answers.  “GodZillapravir had a non-detectable  SVR at weeks 12 and 24 in 85% of patients including those with mild to moderate cirrhosis”. “KingKongViracide cleared Hepatitis C virus in 94% of patients at 24 weeks including children 12 to 18 years of age”.  Which is the better drug?  You can’t tell by the claims because two different patient populations and time lines .  But they have  SVR in common.  That is why researchers use SVR.  BTW I made up the examples.  Now don’t get down on industry just yet.  Academics are accountable to department heads and medical journals.  That can be as powerful as a stockholder.

Industry is different: Stock holders in towers

When it comes to patients , the word “Cure” has emerged because research shows that if you have no detectable virus after six months, the chances of Hep C returning is about 1-2%.  And the argument is that it was never cleared, just so low that it was undetectable.

So with Hepatitis what does this mean?

Successful treatment for Hepatitis C hasn’t been available for long, so doctors are just starting to understand the long-term outcomes.  Do cancer survivors say cured?  I think they say  cancer-free for 2 years, 5 years, etc.  Am I a Hepatitis C survivor or am I cured?  Is it still a pre-existing condition?   A research site, not insurance, paid for my treatments.  But my medical records say Hepatitis C.

So at 24 weeks can I tell the insurance company that I no longer have Hepatitis C?  I can’t find the answer to that question without talking to them directly. I will wait until 2014 (I think that is the year) when they cannot cancel me for pre-existing conditions.  Insurance politics are so confusing, I am not clear if that stipulation is on the potential chopping block.  In speaking with my mental  Dr, I realize that I do not have confidence in my treatment and I am waiting for it to come back.  I am at 4 1/2 months post treatment.   I have been Hep C positive for so long, I don’t know how to have a future in which chronic debilitating illness isn’t a key player.  What is the world like with only mild hypertension and chronic but manageable depression?

Below is a good article for defining end-of-treatment terms, although it is a bit dated.  Newer drugs are not addressed but the terms are the same.

 Hepatitis C: What Is a Sustained Virologic Response or “SVR”? (From Charles  Daniel, former About.com GuideSVR) 

SVR is the closest you’ll get to “a cure” for hepatitis C.
 Sustained virologic response, or SVR, is the goal of hepatitis C treatment.  Conventional treatment (a combination of interferon and ribavirin) doesn’t  necessarily eliminate the hepatitis C virus from your liver. It can, however,  suppress the virus to undetectable levels for an extended period of time. In clinical language, this is called a “sustained virologic response,” or sustained  response. It means that during the six months after you complete treatment,  there is no detectable hepatitis C virus in your blood.                                         SVR is a good thing.
Studies have shown that with a six-month SVR (which means no detectable virus in your blood for six months after finishing treatment), relapse occurred in only 1-2% of patients. So, for every 100 people who finished treatment and attained SVR, the virus will return in only 2 of them. However, for these people, the
virus never really left. The medicine was able to eliminate most of the virus (so much that medical tests couldn’t detect it), but after treatment ended, for whatever reason the virus was able to continue replicating itself.

Early SVR is beneficial
Since the liver has incredible regenerative ability, achieving SVR
 as quickly as possible is important. This is important because some liver damage can be reversed if the cause of the damage is removed. After SVR is reached and depending on the degree of damage from the virus, the risk of hepatocellular cancer is reduced and about 25% of people see an improvement in fibrosis.

SVR compares one treatment to another. For those in treatment, SVR is the goal. However, for physicians and scientists researching new hepatitis treatments, SVR is also used to evaluate new medicines and compare them with proven therapies.
 For example, depending on the genotype, treatment with interferon alone usually achieves SVR in 15% of the patients. When interferon is combined with ribavirin in the same genotype, SVR is increased to 70% in some people.

Jana L. Lee, R.N., CCRC Clinical Research Nurse St. Luke’s Episcopal Hospital Advanced Liver Therapies, my practical answer source and demon fighter.

http://www.hepcadvocacy.org/factsheets/HepatitisC.pdf

http://hepatitis.about.com/bio/Charles-Daniel-37713.htm

Hepatitis C Now Godzillaprevir and KingKongViracide: Yes but is Interferon Still in the Mix?

GodzillaPrevir

KingkongViracide

No matter how powerful add-on drugs are, if Interferon is still part of the mix, many patients will not be able to finish the treatment.  If I was in early stages of Hepatitis C with minimal liver scarring, I would wait 12-24 months for new treatments sans Interferon.  If my Hepatitis C were more advanced, I would go to www.clinicaltrials.gov and type in my disease and city. (Note disclaimer at end of blog)

Below are “press releases” from companies and are mostly targeted to investors, e.g. The market for treating hepatitis C has burgeoned  (My spellchecker doesn’t recognize this as a word) in the last year.

Always look at the source of medical information, if it is Kiss Your Assets Good-Bye or Liver Heard on the Street, run away. If it is the New England Journal of Medicine, or Gastroenterology proceed with caution and a jaundiced eye.  Oops a hepatitis pun.

Dec 1, 2011 – Novel Hep C Treatment Excludes Peginterferon Alfa By: DENISE NAPOLI, Internal Medicine News Digital Network Therapy with a novel

But then if I didn’t read the business news, I wouldn’t know about this for another couple of days:

Bristol-Myers Drops Hepatitis C Drug After Patient Death

Daniel Acker/Bloomberg

Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. has abandoned an experimental hepatitis C pill it bought for $2.5 billion earlier this year after one patient died and others were hospitalized while taking the drug in a study.

                    

Bristol-Myers will take a charge of $1.8 billion in the third quarter related to research and development of the therapy, the New York-based company said in a regulatory filing today. The drugmaker suspended testing the medicine, known as BMS-986094, on Aug. 1 after a patient developed heart failure.

Bristol-Myers said yesterday it has discontinued development of the drug, part of a class of medicines called nucleotide polymerase inhibitors, and was consulting with U.S. regulators to assess the treatment’s effects. Along with the death, eight patients suffered from heart and kidney toxicity, the company said in a statement.

“Bristol-Myers paid a fortune for a pearl that turns out to be fake,” said Erik Gordon, a University of Michigan businessprofessor who follows the health industry, in an e-mail today, referring to the company’s “string of pearls” name for its acquisition strategy. “The Inhibitex acquisition shows the dangers of paying huge premiums for late-stage drug candidates in hot areas. They still can fail.”

I love it:  The dangers of paying huge premiums…Not the dangers of participating in clinical trials. No disrespect to business people, just a different perspective.  I should know, I worked in Big Pharma for twenty-five years.  First make money for share holders, then do no harm to patients.

dictionary.reference.com/browse/inherent existing in someone or something as a permanent and inseparable element, quality, or attribute:

There is inherent risk for patients in clinical trials.  You can quote me on that.

The Hepatitis C Screen Door Swings Two Ways

My father-in-law wanted Viagra.  He wouldn’t shut up about it.  My mother-in-law finally said “Then what?  You’re not getting on me”  eewww, the visual for me….

So we screen for Hepatitis C, then what?

Attention Baby Boomers: The Centers For Disease Control (CDC), the group that tracks bird and swine flu, is thinking about screening you for Hepatitis C.

Hepatitis C is particularly dangerous because it is a silent killer. It can live for decades in a person’s body, slowly destroying the liver, while causing few symptoms,” said Dr. John Ward, director of the CDC’s division of viral hepatitis.

The new guidelines are expected to identify more than 800,000 infections, prevent 100,000 cases of cirrhosis, prevent more than 50,000 cases of liver cancer, and save more than 120,000 lives. Hepatitis C is the leading cause of liver transplants in the United States.

The relatively inexpensive blood test is “a small investment now for a big benefit later,” Ward said.

The CDC believes routine blood tests will address the largely preventable consequences of the disease, especially in light of newly available therapies that can cure around 75 percent of infections.

The field has attracted broad interest with two new hepatitis C drugs, Incivek from Vertex Pharmaceuticals Inc and Merck & Co’s Victrelis, reaching the U.S. market in the past year.

Sorry about the blur, link at bottom if you are interested

Should we screen for Hepatitis C in patients over 50?  There is no vaccine, the standard treatment of Interferon/Ribavirin is about  $60,000 and the eradication rate about 40-50% in the most common genotype (1).  Adding  Boceprevir (Victrelis) is $1,000 a week (x 24 weeks = $24,000). Telaprevir (Incivik) is $4,100 per week (x 24 weeks = $98,000).  So treatment =  $80,000 to $158,000.  They must be really proud of Telaprevir.  At that price they may have to keep it.  All of this assumes 24 week treatment but it is common practice for those on Interferon/Ribavirin to go 48 weeks ($120,000 for dual therapy)

 

These are all rounded numbers and this does not include anything but the drug.  Side effects are horrible.  A few are nausea/vomiting/diarrhea/depression/suicidal and homicidal thoughts/hair loss/anemia/insomnia . The new drugs add full body rash, rectal itching and/or rectal bleeding.  (This reminds me of the old treatments for syphilis: mercury and arsenic).   Many patients cannot hang and drop out. Jobs are lost, families strained and the patients overwhelmed. And then there is that pesky liver transplant for those beyond pharmacologic help (drugs).

But there are currently over 4 million people infected in the US and the largest group are over 50 with long-term damage.  And there are new tests and treatments.  For instance, researchers recently identified a specific DNA sequence in the gene that codes an immune response regulator, called IL28b. Different IL28b sequences predict whether treatment will successfully clear the virus.

With that in mind Goldhaber-Fiebert and Liu of Stanford created a computer model looking for the line at where it makes sense to go through treatment.  Remember that these people think in terms of how many patients out of 1,00 people, not what YOU should do.

After intense statistical and simulation analysis, the model showed that the new triple therapies were indeed cost-effective for chronic hepatitis C patients with advanced liver disease. Despite the large price tag and side effects, the new treatments help these patients avoid costly cancers and liver transplants — as well as allowing them to live longer, higher-quality lives.

For those patients with mild disease, the model indicated that determining their IL-28B genotype is the best next step, before prescribing a treatment.  The closer the threat of severe disease, the more justified treatment costs and risks become, said Goldhaber-Fiebert. “That would be the bottom line.”

Though these new drugs may offer relatively desirable options now, both Goldhaber-Fiebert and Liu noted that additional, and perhaps more effective, drugs are already in clinical trials.”

So in the “State-The-Obvious” department  they conclude: “As more and better treatments become available, the decision will continue to evolve, requiring further analysis, patients and health systems could also benefit from price competition with multiple treatment options available. But ultimately, treatment decisions will remain a private conversation between a doctor and a patient. “

A bit chicken shit but common in the academic world.  All studies end in “Further research is needed”.  Which is academic speak for “See you at the next medical conference where I will have more data”.  Note the reference to “health systems”.  This includes the insurance company.

Now, as a taxpayer, I wonder where the money is coming from. You can see one reason a clinical trial is an attractive option.  I didn’t pay a nickel.  In fact they paid my gas and parking.  BTW my results from 12 week post treatment just came back “No detectable virus”.  So why do I have a trace of cynicism about drug companies pushing for testing?

My mom used to yell, “close the screen door, you are letting the flies out”.  I always thought that was funny. Regarding screening and insurance that may be true but not so funny.

http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_125350.html

http://health.yahoo.net/news/s/nm/all-baby-boomers-should-get-tested-for-hepatitis-c-cdc

http://med.stanford.edu/ism/2012/february/hepatitis.html

Ungrateful Bastard that I am…Hepatitis C

You Bastard, you killed Kenny

Hepatitis C treatment ended five weeks ago.  All is going well (~ nothing is wrong).  Went to Costa Rica with grand kids, hiked (slowly) up mountain sides.  Thank you Symbicort and red blood cells.  Now home.  I want to lay in guest bedroom (my sick room), watch recorded TV shows and eat sugar.  What’s up with that?  Fighting some mental and physical depression.  Back up.  Not necessarily so…anytime things are caddy wampass I frighten myself with the depression (DEBression) stick.  Kinda like a boogie man under the bed.

Ungrateful bastard that I am, I want to just “be okay”.  WTF does that mean?  Everyone who is “okay” raise your something.  Last time I re-uped for life post-treatment, I slowly weeded the front garden to demonstrate focus and progress to myself.  It took a week.  Currently it is 108 F heat index…so the hell with that.  I go to bed and get up the same time everyday.  Learning how to fall asleep naturally.  Not true…trying to learn how to fall asleep.  I’ve always had some distressing insomnia.  Maybe that contributed to my drinking a quarter century ago.  Maybe not. Currently I’m on two non sedating antidepressants and one sedating, slowly weaning off.  I can hear AA people judging.  Ta hell with ’em. Note to self:   What other people think of me is of no consequence.

You’d think I’d be more sensitive to the term bastard.  I’m not.  One thing I’m clear about, being born out-of-wedlock is not my burden.  Not sure I knew that 30-40 years ago.  And views change.

“Now more than half of all births to American women under 30 are born out of wedlock, and the trend in marriage-less birth is becoming an accepted reality of American life.” Don’t you love marriage-less over out of wedlock?  I wonder which group with an axe to grind is funding this.

“According to an analysis of government data, conducted by the research group Child Trends and reported by The New York Times, the last 20 years have seen illegitimacy among white women in their 20s with some college — but not a full four-year degree — rise more quickly than in other groups.”  …gotta love the internet.

Ah, yet another chapter in “Me-Me-Me”  My favorite subject, I am afraid.  Better keep dancing with the psychiatrist a bit longer. 

http://www.mysymbicort.com/

“You bastard, you killed Kenny”http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=1A6f3jHTC-Y

http://articles.businessinsider.com/2012-02-21/home/31081751_1_illegitimacy-black-children-unmarried-women