Hepatitis C: The Post Interferon World has Five Scoops of Good News

Hep C:  The Post Interferon World is Five Scoops of Good News

  1.  Increased number of patients screened and identified
  2.  Increased options for those who failed previous therapies
  3.  Improved patient compliance
  4.  Possibilities of patient-guided treatment
  5.  Decreased need for liver transplantation
Donna Reed on Laundry day.  Now her modern day peers can get tested.

Donna Reed on Laundry day. Now her modern day peers can get tested.

  •   I quit writing my blog when I saw the first ad for Hepatitis C treatment on television. The representative people were not parrot heads or crack heads. They were typical ad people like Crestor or Nexium. These ads will bring people in for testing and treatment.  The early treatment decreases transplantation demands. But there is still a lot of Hepatitis C news, so I am back.

A friend of mine started round four of treatment three days ago and she is scared.  Because of Interferon and depression, she could not complete previous treatments. No pledge from me or her physician made a dent in her fear but time will show her. Her new protocol doesn’t call for Interferon, and she is on preventive anti-depression medication. The three drug cocktail for her is one of many not available six months ago, a bygone era.

I recall Fridays during treatment, Interferon injection days. Bathing and grooming started on Wednesdays. I could schedule most work meetings (via telephone) for Thursday and Friday. There is much compliance built around Interferon day. For me, there came the day I could not  work and Friday no longer mattered. Unfortunately leaving work isn’t always an available solution. I lost my career when I returned and I was still sick from drugs. Luckily I retired with benefits.  When I went through treatment # 2, I wasn’t working and could get all the rest required. In the post Interferon world of (mostly) no Interferon and ribavirin this may not be an issue, thus better patient compliance, and cure.

 

And now about patient-guided therapy and no you do not get to select from a menu. For those of you following genotyping using IL2b.  Researchers predict (I love that phrase) which treatments will work best in your body.  That will partially determine the treatment drugs for you, thus ruling out waste-of-time and money treatments.

Be sure to visit my friends at http://www.hepatitiscnews.com  They have great usable info and practical application.  They carry my blog too.

https://us-mg4.mail.yahoo.com/neo/launch?.rand=084ro4ia0h0pr#1

Kentaro Matsuura, Tsunamasa Watanabe, Yasuhito Tanaka

Disclosures

J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2014;29(2):241-249. 

Advertisements

Hep C Treatment: Do We Or Don’t We? And Who the Hell Does Egypt Know That We Don’t?

I’m going to  ask you to hang with me on this one.  It is a lesson in pharmaceutical pricing and what your insurance will/can pay. Medicaid can’t! 

I worked in Big Pharma Research and Medical Affairs for a quarter century.  So? I see pricing strategies for Hepatitis C treatment compounds and they will affect you.  Let’s look at:

  1. Pricing Strategies for Big Pharma, and they DO have one for who, how much, and how long
  2. How some get to bypass this pricing strategy entirely
  3. Why patients will unnecessarily suffer with this curable Hep C

These days you can’t swing a cat without uncovering a new treatment on the horizon!  Good! Right?  Mostly.  Big Pharma competitors have a short time on top and intend to make  as much profit for stakeholders (stock holders)as possible.  It is the job.

Remember when Vertex launched Incivek (telaprevir) fourteen months ago?  First new drug in forever.  All new patients were given Incivek along with the standard cocktail of Interferon/Ribavirin.  Vertex was the new darling in hepatology, for a year. Sales went from $76.1 Million Q 1 2013 to $44.3 Million Q 4 2013. Now they have dropped out of Hep C research because there is a new rock star launch; Gilead Sciences with Sovaldi (sofusbuvir).

“Record sales of a new hepatitis C drug, Sovaldi, pushed the first-quarter earnings of Gilead Sciences far beyond expectations, the company reported on Tuesday, Sovaldi (sofusbuvir), the company’s $1,000-a-pill medicine to treat hepatitis C, had sales of $2.27 billion in the first quarter, the company said in a statement. That beat an average of analyst estimates by more than $1 billion. The Foster City, California-based company also reported profit excluding certain items of $1.48 a share, beating by 56 cents the analysts’ average estimate (GILD:US). (Yes that is Billion not Million.) The hepatitis C sales are “above even the high end of buy-side expectations,” Mark Schoenebaum, an analyst with ISI Group LLC in New York, said in a note to clients. He called it the best drug introduction in history. Gilead, the world’s biggest makers of HIV drugs, yesterday reported total first-quarter revenue of $5 billion.

Gilead is awaiting U.S. regulatory approval of a two-drug combination with Sovaldi that does away with shots that boost the immune system, yet produce side effects. Company executives said they are aware of the price criticism and the sustainability of spending on the drug. “There are natural limits on what I think is appropriate for next generation products,” Chief Operating Officer John Milligan said yesterday on a conference call.”

 

“If cost were not a factor, we would want to treat the entire population,” said Dr. Rena Fox, a professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco. She said it was frustrating that “we finally get this great treatment and then we withhold it.” 

Ah,  my point exactly.

And then there is Egypt. Yes that Egypt.

On March 12 the Egyptians declared  that negotiations between the ministry and the American company were successful and Egypt will obtain the drug for only 1 percent of its price internationally, according to Al-Masry Al-Youm. Adawy, Minister.  The price of a one-month prescription in Egypt will cost $300 while in the U.S. it costs $28,000 a month. (Yes that is Hundred, not Thousand).  The full course will cost $13,000 instead of the $168,000 it costs in the U.S.. They agreed to support making hepatitis c a top priority and to intensify efforts to provide the required medicine at “affordable prices”. According to Reuters, Gilead said on March 22 that it was “pleased to have finalized an agreement” to provide the cure to Egypt, one of the countries with the highest rate of hepatitis C patients.

 

 

May 6, 2014:  Janssen Submits Supplemental New Drug Application to U.S. FDA for OLYSIO™ (Simeprevir) for Once-Daily Use in Combination with Sofosbuvir for 12 Weeks for the Treatment of Adult Patients with Genotype 1 Chronic Hepatitis C. AbbVie, Merck, Bristol-Meyers-Squibb and Johnson & Johnson have potential treatments on the horizon. This is why Gilead is gouging now.  Big Pharma calls it recouping research money. Some is profit too.   It’s all perspective.  Which a Hep C patient is sorely missing.

I shit you not. Thanks for hanging with me on Big Pharma Pricing.  Now you can teach MBA students.  I am feeling powerless though.  Maybe you know someone in Egypt.

One last thought:  I am clear of Hep C Virus after two years and I wish this for you.

Go see my friends at http://www.hepatitiscnews.com  They have great helpful news all the time!

hcvnewdrugs@gmail.com

 

http://www.businessweek.com/news/2014-04-22/gilead-beats-hepatitis-c-sales-estimates-by-1-billion

 

http://www.fiercepharma.com/story/vertex-profits-one-time-gain-despite-plummeting-incivek-sales/2014-01-29