HEPATITIS C: THE HAPPY-EVER-AFTER ENDING

Happy Ever After, Mostly

Happy Ever After, Mostly

I witnessed a marker for Hepatitis C yesterday that three years ago was impossible. On CBS, Gilead was advertising treatment/cure for Hepatitis C. Consider that three years ago admission of having Hep C was admission of a dark past, even when none existed. Consider that only 20% Hep C positive people even knew their status. Consider that three years ago treatment success was 40-50% even with forty-eight weeks, multiple drugs that were disabling and exacerbated long-term crippling depression. The latest treatment recommendations for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection are now available on www.HCVguidelines.org, the result of a collaboration between the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD), the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), and the International Antiviral Society-USA. These are the few that know what is happening. http://hcvguidelines.org/sites/default/files/AASLD-IDSA_PressRelease.pdf   

Drug development for HCV is progressing rapidly, with new direct-acting antiviral medications capable of essentially curing HCV. Eugene Schiff, MD, director, Schiff Center for Liver Disease at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine in Florida, commented on the development of the Web site in an interview with Medscape Medical News. “The reason [for the development of the Web site] is that the field is moving so rapidly…the [US Food and Drug Administration] is trying to advance some of these [medications] faster than they have traditionally in the past, which is wonderful for the patients,” Dr. Schiff said. “Because of all this, the average clinician can’t keep up with it, and they’re trying to be more in sync with the advances,” he added. “In just the past 3 months, 2 new medications became available for treating HCV that hold a great deal of promise for patients living with this disease, and more are expected. HCVguidelines.org provides physicians with the latest information and informed guidance on the available treatment options based on a rigorous review of data,” Barbara Murray, MD, president of IDSA, explained in the statement. “[The development of newer drugs is] of historical significance. We are quickly approaching 100% cure rates of this disease with treatment,” Dr. Schiff explained. “The presence of a readily available, frequently updated guidance document is a great service to providers and their patients, who will benefit from modern treatments that result in cure of HCV up to 95% of the time,” Michael Saag, MD, a member of the board of directors of the International Antiviral Society-USA and a cochair of the guidance panel, said in the statement. “The site will be updated regularly to keep pace with improved diagnostic tools and new drug options as they meet [US Food and Drug Administration] approval,” according to the statement. The Web site will include an ongoing summary of recent changes. Guidance for Insurance Carriers.   Also The rapid development of medications has made insurance companies as well as clinicians unsure of the best treatment options

The newer drugs are expensive, and not all insurance carriers are willing to pay for them. The guidelines may help insurance carriers evaluate the appropriateness of these drugs for patients with HCV. As the drugs become more available to patients, the cost may go down, Dr. Schiff said.

Even though the newer drugs are expensive, they may still be cost-effective if they are curing patients, he added.

Guidance for Insurance Carriers Also

The rapid development of medications has made insurance companies as well as clinicians unsure of the best treatment options, the statement explains.

The newer drugs are expensive, and not all insurance carriers are willing to pay for them. The guidelines may help insurance carriers evaluate the appropriateness of these drugs for patients with HCV. As the drugs become more available to patients, the cost may go down, Dr. Schiff said.

Even though the newer drugs are expensive, they may still be cost-effective if they are curing patients, he added.

 

 

Hepatitis C: More Affordable Treatment Possible

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/819086

This attached link presents interesting models for lowering treatment drug costs.  Not necessarily doable, but interesting.  Remember I worked for drug companies for decades.

Thank You Gilead for GS 5885 /  Solvaldi.  Saved my liver!

Good Bye everyone, thanks for your support.

Special thanks to Jana Lee RN and Advanced Liver Therapies.  Time for you to tackle something else like Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease or decrease liver transplants rejections; and do something awesome again.

www.HCVguidelines.org  Give this to your physician

http://hcvguidelines.org/sites/default/files/AASLD-IDSA_PressRelease.pdf

http://www.gilead.com/medicines/product-approval-timeline.